It Follows

It Follows

It Follows

It Follows
A young woman is followed by an unknown supernatural force after getting involved in a sexual encounter.

Okay, so don’t waste your money.  When it comes out for free on Netflix, you have zero movies left in your queue, and you want to waste a little under 2 hours, then, and only then, watch this movie.

I actually thought Maika Monroe did a good job with what she had to work with.  The concept of the movie is pretty good but it just didn’t come together.  Lots of holes, lots of empty pockets, just…not good.

I was one of 2 people watching the movie.  Granted, it was a 1:25pm showing on Tuesday.  Therefore, the number of people, or lack there of, didn’t bother me at all.  I saw it at the Cinebarre in Thornton.  I’ve been to Cinebarre in Louisville, CO but that was my first, and last time visiting that theater.  From the entrance of the building to the theater is long, dark, dreary and depressing walk.  The walls have amazing movie posters but that’s it.  I had a very friendly woman at the bar selling the tickets, she even swapped me her ink for my marker pen.  I’m left handed so I hate marker pens.  My server, Darbi, was also super friendly and super nice.  The ladies room smelled 1 step better than a porta potty.  My theater was #6.  It’s right beyond the kitchen.  The kitchen smelled like, I don’t know, really old grease or something weird.  But, back to the movie!

My first thought, within the first few seconds of the start of the film was, “take your heels off to run”.  Second thought?  “You’re parked so far onto the beach that you can’t see the road.  You’ve walked numerous feet beyond your car and you’re sitting in the sand, talking on your phone, and you still have those heels on?”  Stupid thoughts to have?  Yeah, probably, but my mind never really shuts up.

We start finding out how this story pans out when Jay and Hugh (aka Jeff) are in the ticket line at a movie theater.  She want to play “Trade Game”.  Trade game is where you scan a crowd of people and pick out who you would like to trade places with.  The person you’re playing with gets 2 guesses to figure out who you chose and why.  When Hugh points to the girl he thinks Jay would trade places with, Jay can’t see her.

The 2 have sex a couple of scenes later.  We find out that when “It’s Following” you, you pass it one to someone else through sex.  Huh?  Like an STD?  If what follows you kills you, it goes back to the person that gave it to you and tries to kill them.  It goes back to killing as far back as the those still living goes.

I like doing movies where I can find out, and post, if addresses are real, if the murders discussed were real, etc.  Nothing like that in this movie for me to do.  It was shot in and around Detroit.

One thing I did like about this movie was that it didn’t try to shock you.  So many new horror movies just go for shock factor.  This didn’t have anything like that and it felt a bit more like a throwback movie.  The cinematography was really cool.  I’ve read other reviews and I see that I’m pretty much alone on disliking the movie.  If I was 14 – 18, I think I would have liked it more.  It just didn’t feel like it had much depth.  The acting was good, the cinematography was great, the music was so-so, the plot was good just not well put together.

For me?  3 stars out of 10.

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Sinister 2

Sinister 2

Sinister 2

Sinister 2

I am overly excited to see that the sequel is coming out!  I don’t know why but Sinister is one of my 2 favorite horror movies (Grave Encounters is my other).  I’m ever MORE thrilled to know that Deputy So-and-So is going to be in the movie.  I absolutely LOVED that character!

You can read our post about the first Sinister movie by clicking here.  It will answer a lot of question about how much history in the movie is real and how much is Hollywood.

 

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Mark Twain Witnessed Execution

Mark Twain Witnessed Execution

Mark Twain Witnessed Execution

Mark Twain Witnessed Execution
On April 24, 1868, Mark Twain witness the execution of murderer John Millian.

*Millian was hanged for murdering a prostitute named Julia Bulette
*He wasn’t caught for a few months but got caught when he tried to sell one of Julia Bulette’s dresses
*He was hanged April 24, 1868
*Mark Twain witnessed the execution
*Twain wrote about the execution.  It was published in the Chicago Republican May 31, 1868

NOVEL ENTERTAINMENT.

But I am tired talking about mines. I saw a man hanged the other day. John Melanie, of France. He was the first man ever hanged in this city (or country either), where the first twenty six graves in the cemetery were those of men who died by shots and stabs.

I never had witnessed an execution before, and did not believe I could be present at this one without turning away my head at the last moment. But I did not know what fascination there was about the thing, then. I only went because I thought I ought to have a lesson, and because I believed that if ever it would be possible to see a man hanged, and derive satisfaction from the spectacle, this was the time. For John Melanie was no common murderer — else he would have gone free. He was a heartless assassin. A year ago, he secreted himself under the house of a woman of the town who lived alone, and in the dead watches of the night, he entered her room, knocked her senseless with a billet of wood as she slept, and then strangled her with his fingers. He carried off all her money, her watches, and every article of her wearing apparel, and the next day, with quiet effrontery, put some crepe on his arm and walked in her funeral procession.

Afterward he secreted himself under the bed of another woman of the town, and in the middle of the night was crawling out with a slung-shot in one hand and a butcher knife in the other, when the woman discovered him, alarmed the neighborhood with her screams, and he retreated from the house. Melanie sold dresses and jewelry here and there until some of the articles were identified as belonging to the murdered courtezan. He was arrested and then his later intended victim recognized him.

After he was tried and condemned to death, he used to curse and swear at all who approached him; and he once grossly insulted some young Sisters of Charity who came to minister kindly to his wants. The morning of the execution, he joked with the barber, and told him not to cut his throat — he wanted the distinction of being hanged.

This is the man I wanted to see hung. I joined the appointed physicians, so that I might be admitted within the charmed circle and be close to Melanie. Now I never more shall be surprised at anything. That assassin got out of the closed carriage, and the first thing his eye fell upon was that awful gallows towering above a great sea of human heads, out yonder on the hill side and his cheek never blanched, and never a muscle quivered! He strode firmly away, and skipped gaily up the steps of the gallows like a happy girl. He looked around upon the people, calmly; he examined the gallows with a critical eye, and with the pleased curiosity of a man who sees for the first time a wonder he has often heard of. He swallowed frequently, but there was no evidence of trepidation about him — and not the slightest air of braggadocio whatever. He prayed with the priest, and then drew out an abusive manuscript and read from it in a clear, strong voice, without a quaver in it. It was a broad, thin sheet of paper, and he held it apart in front of him as he stood. If ever his hand trembled in even the slightest degree, it never quivered that paper. I watched him at that sickening moment when the sheriff was fitting the noose about his neck, and pushing the knot this way and that to get it nicely adjusted to the hollow under his ear — and if they had been measuring Melanie for a shirt, he could not have been more perfectly serene. I never saw anything like that before. My own suspense was almost unbearable — my blood was leaping through my veins, and my thoughts were crowding and trampling upon each other. Twenty moments to live — fifteen to live — ten to live — five — three — heaven and earth, how the time galloped! — and yet that man stood there unmoved though he knew that the sheriff was reaching deliberately for the drop while the black cap descended over his quiet face! — then down through the hole in the scaffold the strap-bound figure shot like a dart! — a dreadful shiver started at the shoulders, violently convulsed the whole body all the way down, and died away with a tense drawing of the toes downward, like a doubled fist — and all was over!

I saw it all. I took exact note of every detail, even to Melanie’s considerately helping to fix the leather strap that bound his legs together and his quiet removal of his slippers — and I never wish to see it again. I can see that stiff, straight corpse hanging there yet, with its black pillow-cased head turned rigidly to one side, and the purple streaks creeping through the hands and driving the fleshy hue of life before them. Ugh!

There’s actually a Bonanza episode about Julia Bulette.  I haven’t watched it.  I don’t know if it’s based on the same woman or not (she does work in the brothel in the show) but came across it during my research.

Another fun note, there’s a Julia Bulette Red Light Museum in Virginia City, NV.  Gotta love Roadside America!

You can read more information about Julia on this website.

This murder is discussed in the Ghost Adventures Documentary Film July 25, 2004.  You can read about this documentary by clicking here.

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